Sofia Aldinio

2021 ZEKE Award Winners

Sofia Aldinio

Photograph by Sofia Aldinio

This award is presented each year by Social Documentary Network to recognize excellence in documentary photography. The two first place winners this year are:

Sofia AldinioAwake in the Desert Land: Migration, Climate Change, and Historical Memory

An ongoing project documenting how climate change is uprooting small, inland, and coastal communities in Baja California, Mexico, which depend directly on natural resources to survive—thereby threatening cultural heritage.

Nicolò Filippo Rosso Path Away: Thousands Flee Violence, Climate Change, and Economic Collapse For North America

Two months after Hurricanes Eta and Iota hit Central America, leaving 4.5 million victims of flooding and mudslides, 11,000 people gathered in San Pedro Sula, Honduras—starting the first migrants’ caravan of the year directed to the U.S. The migrants’ crossing through gang-controlled areas, deserts, and jungles was made even harder by the pandemic. International aid is scant, and many migrants’ shelters and charity kitchens closed their doors to avoid contagion.

PRESENTED BY
Featuring: Sofia Aldinio, Nicolò Filippo Rosso
Curated by: Glenn Ruga
Location: Brooklyn Bridge Park - Pier 3

First-Place Winners:

Sofia Aldinio

Nicolò Filippo Rosso

 

Honorable Mention Winners:

Kirsten Rebekah Bethmann

Misha Maslennikov

Ashkan Shabani

Richard Sharum

David Verberckt

About The Artists

Sofia Aldinio is an Argentine American documentary photographer and storyteller based between Joshua Tree, California and Baja California, Mexico. Her career as a documentary photographer started in 2014, and her work is guided by themes such as immigration, climate change, and preserving natural and cultural heritage. Being both an immigrant and a Latino woman has deeply influenced her way of seeing and thinking. Over the past five years her work has focused on amplifying the stories of immigrants and refugees arriving in the Northeast of the United States. Her current project Awake in the Desert Land explores how climate change is threatening traditions and ways of life in small communities living in Baja California, Mexico, that depend directly on natural resources to survive.

Nicolò Filippo Rosso is an Italian documentary photographer based in Colombia. Photographing in Latin America is often about witnessing stories of trauma, inequality, and injustices that have shattered the region for generations. Rosso tells stories of abandoned communities, mass migration crises, conflict, and climate change. Since 2018, after numerous editorial assignments documenting Venezuelan migration in Colombia, Rosso decided to work on that historical phenomenon personally. He started spending weeks and months in some of the border areas—walking along the migration routes with those who have no money to reach a major city or the next border by bus. In 2021, expanding an already-existing body of work, he traveled to Central America and Mexico to document the crossing of refugees and migrants into the United States. In addition to his personal and editorial work for magazines, newspapers, and NGOs, he often lectures about photography and journalism at universities in Colombia, Europe, and the United States.

About The Organization

Social Documentary Network (SDN) is a global community of documentary photographers, editors, curators, NGOs, students, journalists, and others who believe in the power of visual storytelling to build understanding and appreciation for the complexities, nuances, wonders, and contradictions that abound in the world today. Since our founding in 2008, the SDN website has featured more than 3,000 exhibits by nearly 2,000 photographers from all corners of the globe. Today, we have grown beyond the boundaries of a computer screen and produce gallery exhibitions, educational programs, calls for entries and our print magazine, ZEKE: The Magazine of Global Documentary. Recent exhibits on SDN have explored migration, the rising seas of Antarctica, Iran, asylum in America, teen mothers, and nomads of Kyrgyzstan.

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