Photoville

Camille Seaman

Photographer Camille Seaman believes in capturing images that articulate how humans are not separate from nature. Born to a Native American father and African American mother, Seaman’s sense of connection with nature stems from the influence of her Shinnecock Indian grandfather on Long Island, New York. She graduated from the State University of New York at Purchase where she studied photography with Jan Groover and John Cohen. She has spent the last two decades documenting the rapidly changing landscapes of Earth’s polar regions — from South Georgia, the Falkland Islands, and below the Antarctic Circle, to Greenland, Canada, and beyond. Her photographs have been published in National Geographic. Her work has also appeared in Outside, TIME, the New York Times Magazine, American Photo, and German GEO, among other outlets. Seaman has been a TED Senior Fellow since 2013, and was also named a Stanford Knight Fellow and a Cinereach Filmmaker in Residence Fellow. She leads photographic workshops all over the globe, and enjoys inspiring others to develop a unique visual voice.

Current Exhibitions Featuring Camille Seaman

Solastalgia

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza

Presented by The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting

Solastalgia documents the relationship between people and their environments, focusing on the distress caused by a changing climate. It reveals the threats to our planet that affect us all — from Indigenous communities in the Amazon and alpaca farmers in Peru, to the Arctic and the United States.

Learn More

A Matter of Time: Returning to Antarctica in the time of Covid

Winter Garden Gallery, Brookfield Place

Presented by Arts Brookfield, in partnership with Photoville

It was the longest night of the year here on the Weddell Sea. On the solstice, the sunset and sunrise happen side by side on the horizon — only two hours apart. The colors of the sunset merged into the colors of the sunrise. It felt surreal — the neon colors, the symmetry, and the pieces of ice — like a dream on a distant planet.

 

Learn More

This website was made possible thanks to the generous support and partnership of Photowings