Photoville

Exhibitions Tagged #Black History

We Were Beautiful Then, Too: Late 19th Century African American Cabinet Cards

St. Nicholas Park – 132nd Street and 139th Street
 on show

Presented by The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

This exhibition highlights a selection of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture’s holdings in 19th century portraits of African Americans.

Learn More

In A Time of Panthers: Early Photographs

Brooklyn Bridge Park – New Dock Street
 archive : 2022

Presented by Henson Scales Productions, Clair Oliver Gallery, SPQR Editions, and Photoville

These images serve as a time capsule of sorts — not only of my adolescence and political awakening, but also of the country whose ongoing struggle with racial inequality, police brutality, and resistance is as urgent and timely as ever.

Learn More

Black Baby Jesus was born in February

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 1
 archive : 2022

Presented by Photoville

A visual story about why the Afro-Colombian community of Quinamayó celebrates Christmas in February, expressing resistance through culture since their ancestors were enslaved people.

Learn More

Saved By Grace

South Beach Promenade
 archive : 2021

Alice Austen House presents Saved by Grace, an ongoing project by Nataki Hewling documenting senior Black men. This visual story sends the message that our communities need Black male elders to nourish our ecosystems. We need to go the distance to protect their lives.

Learn More

Been Seen

St. Nicholas Park – 132nd Street and 139th Street
 archive : 2021

The exhibition places in conversation the work of Harlem-based studio photographer Austin Hansen (1910-1996) with six contemporary photographers: Dario Calmese, Cheriss May, Flo Ngala, Ricky Day, Gerald Peart, and Mark Clennon. Their practices explore identity, Black experiences, visual culture, and portraiture.

Learn More

The Atlantic’s Inheritance: A Project About American History, Black Life, And The Resilience Of Memory

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Empire Fulton Ferry Lawn
 archive : 2021

The Atlantic’s Inheritance is an ongoing reporting project that endeavors to fill the blank pages of Black history: to piece together, through reporting and data, the crucial events and conversations that have been intentionally left out of America’s story.

Learn More

Reclaiming History

Washington Street and Prospect Street
 archive : 2021

Monuments examine passive relics of America’s racist past in the Confederacy, the dynamic changing of these landscapes, and who will be honored now.

Learn More

BLACKNESS IS

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Empire Fulton Ferry Lawn
 archive : 2020

BLACKNESS IS seeks to highlight and challenge nuanced ideas of Black identity through the presentation of questions blended with landscape scenes of a desert, an environment known to be oppressive towards human life.

Learn More

Die lewe is nie reg vir my nie (This life is not right for me)

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 5
 archive : 2020

Gangsterism in Schauderville was constructed during the apartheid era. Although apartheid is abolished, the trauma that emerged from years of oppression is still alive. This work exemplifies a humane representation of a community, trying not to let the past, nor the stereotypes, define them.

Learn More

In Our Season of Discontent, Count It All Joy

St. Nicholas Park – 132nd Street and 139th Street
 archive : 2020

An exploration of the Black vernacular through archival photographs depicting gatherings, essential workers, pioneers, genius, and joy.

Learn More

Scars of Racism

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2019

Scars of Racism seeks to document the lasting physical reminders of racism on the American landscape.

Learn More

There is Only One Paul R. Williams

Annenberg Space for Photography
 archive : Photoville LA

There is Only One Paul R. Williams highlights the work of a brilliant and prolific black architect who made a name for himself in pre-Civil Rights Movement America.

Learn More

Don Hogan Charles

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2018

Don Hogan Charles was the first black photographer to be hired by The New York Times, in 1964. In his more than four devades at The Times, Don photographed politicians, celebrities, fashion, food and everyday life in New York City. But he may be best remembered for the work that earne him early acclaim: his photographs of key moments and figures of the civil rights era.

Learn More

Ebifananyi, The Photographers Trilogy

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2018

In presentations of historical photographs from Africa, Uganda was—until recently—only mentioned in relation to photographs produced by non-Ugandans or members of the Ugandan diaspora. The first three books in the Ebifananyi series change this status quo by presenting photographs produced by Deo Kyakulagira (1940-2000), Musa Katuramu (1916-1983) and Elly Rwakoma (ca.1938).

Learn More

In These Clasped Hands

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2018

“In These Clasped Hands” started as a series of portraits of my family members in South Carolina. However, after the Mother Emanuel AME Church massacre, the effects of loss could be felt throughout the state.

Learn More

Fade Resistance

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2015

Fade Resistance is an archival project that seeks to restore the narrative impact of thousands of found African American vernacular Polaroid photographs.

Learn More

Events and Sessions Tagged #Black History

Oct 32021

New Authors, Old Histories

Join National Geographic photographers Philip Cheung, Kris Graves, and Daniella Zalcman in conversation with National Geographic Executive Editor Debra Adams Simmons, as they discuss their ongoing projects visualizing racist and discriminatory histories through a new lens.

Learn More
Oct 32020

Black Hollywood: Here Before Now

What does today’s Black Hollywood look like through the lens of a seasoned Black photographer?

Learn More

This website was made possible thanks to the generous support and partnership of Photowings