Photoville

The Open Society Foundations

The Open Society Foundations

The Open Society Foundations, founded by George Soros, are the world’s largest private funder of independent groups working for justice, democratic governance, and human rights. George Soros opened his first international foundation in Hungary in 1984.

Today, the Open Society Foundations support a vast array of projects in more than 120 countries, providing thousands of grants every year through a network of national and regional foundations and offices.

Future Events Supported by The Open Society Foundations

Jun 152024

MFON Global Symposium: Presence & Preservation

The one-day symposium will include a series of panel discussions, featuring scholars, artists, curators and centered around archiving and elevating the voices of women and non-binary of photographers of African descent, as part of Photoville’s annual Festival in New York City.

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Archive Exhibitions Supported by The Open Society Foundations

Broken Promises: Navigating a World Under Taliban Rule

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2023

Broken Promises offers an intimate glimpse into the lives of women and girls in Afghanistan, and the devastating consequences of the rollback in their rights following the Taliban takeover in 2021.

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Covering a Crisis: Media Representation of Overdose in America

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2019

By questioning the main visual tropes in mainstream media of drug use and overdose, and challenging sensationalist coverage, this exhibit explores how photojournalism impacts public health.

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Extraordinary Women in West Africa

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2017

This exhibition and documentary traces the lives of five West African women, emphasizing the exceptional contribution of women to development.

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Ebola Through the Lens

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2016

Apart from health workers and people within the communities, photojournalists were among the few others to come face-to-face with Ebola. The exhibit showcases some of their work, providing a space to share their experiences and the stories behind the moments captured.

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Texting Syria

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2016

Texting Syria is an installation exploring the experience of Syrian refugees in the context of connectivity in the digital age. In these portraits, Syrians in Lebanon fleeing the civil war back home use mobile phones to stay in touch with their families who remain under siege in the city of Homs. A mundane and ubiquitous act — checking or sending a text message — is transformed by war into communiqués that can be a matter of life and death.

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Diagram of the Heart

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2015

Rabi Tale is one of several dozen popular romance novelists living in the northern city of Kano, Nigeria’s second biggest city, and the city with the largest Muslim population in the country.

 

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Toxic Sites US

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2015

Toxic Sites US (toxicsites.us) is an online data visualization and sharing platform for the over 1300 Superfund sites or the worst toxic contamination sites in the US as designated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

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I AM A FOREIGNER: Labor Migration From Central Asia to Russia

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 5 Uplands
 archive : 2014

An estimated 5-6 million people from Central Asia migrate to Russia every year in search of work. I Am a Foreigner documents the journey of these migrants as they travel by train from Central Asia, and illustrates the realities they face upon arrival in their new home.

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Interrogations

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 5 Uplands
 archive : 2013

Interrogations is about a place where justice, mercy, hope, and despair are manufactured, bought, bartered, and sold; a sound-proofed factory where truth is both the final product and the one thing that never leaves the room.

 

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Photo Requests from Solitary

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 5 Uplands
 archive : 2013

What would a person in complete isolation want to see? Men in solitary confinement at Tamms supermax prison in Illinois were asked to request a photograph of anything in the world, real or imagined, and Tamms Year Ten found photographers to make the images.

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Tent Life: Haiti

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 3
 archive : 2012

In “Tent Life: Haiti,” the Open Society Foundations will present American photographer Wyatt Gallery, who spent a year documenting the tragic living conditions in Haiti following the 2010 earthquake.

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Archive Sessions and Events Supported by The Open Society Foundations

Sep 242016

Images of Africa: Lessons Learned from Media Coverage of Crises

At the height of the recent Ebola outbreak in West Africa, there was intense global media coverage — much of it focused on international aid efforts. The media was criticized for depicting Africans as silent victims, ignoring the many citizens who mobilized to fight the epidemic. What role can media play in conveying a more nuanced and multifaceted view?

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Sep 222013

Photo Requests from Solitary

The “Photo Requests from Solitary” event at Photoville brings together artists, activists, journalists, and survivors of solitary confinement. This panel discussion with accompanying slide show will introduce audiences to the reality of torture taking place in their own backyards, while exploring the power of photography to humanize one of the most marginalized group of people in our society, educate the public and the press, and spur social change on one of our most pressing domestic human rights issues.

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Sep 212013

Artist Talk: Donald Weber

Following an exploratory trip to Chernobyl in 2005, Donald Weber soon returned to the abandoned site of the nuclear disaster and spent the next six years in Russia and Ukraine photographing the ruins of the unstoppable storm we call history. Traveling and living with ordinary people who had survived much, had survived everything, Weber began to see the modern State as a primitive and bloody sacrificial rite of unnamed Power.

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This website was made possible thanks to the generous support and partnership of Photowings