Photoville

Exhibitions Tagged #Indigenous Voices

Project 562: Changing The Way We See Native America

Times Square
 on show

Presented by Photoville and Time Square Arts, with additional support from the Phillip and Edith Leonian Foundation

Created by Matika Wilbur, Project 562 is a multi-year national photography project dedicated to photographing over 562 federally-recognized tribes in what is currently called the United States, resulting in an unprecedented repository of imagery and oral histories which accurately portrays contemporary Native Americans.

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Reflections on Indigeneity in the Bronx

Van Cortland Park
 on show

Presented by The Bronx Women’s Photo Collective with Photoville and NYC Parks

The Bronx Women’s Photo Collective, a group of self-taught photographers, memorialize the story of their search for their Taíno roots through three original photography projects.

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KANITLOW

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 1
 archive : 2022

Presented by Indigenous Photograph, Photoville, and Leica Camera

There is a word in Zapotec used to name someone or something disappearing — when a close friend is not close anymore, when someone stops visiting as often as they do, when things transform and change, or when someone is going blind. This word, kanitlow, means “faces are getting lost,” or “disappearing.”

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Sustainable Solutions to the Climate Crisis

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2022

Presented by Social Documentary Network, ZEKE Magazine

These documentary exhibits explore sustainable solutions to the climate crisis: the Indigenous People’s Burn Network in the western United States; Nemo’s Garden in Italy — the world’s first underwater greenhouse; the African Women Rising’s Permagarden Program in Uganda, and others.

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Made in Land: Spoken Memories

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2022

Presented by The 400 Years Project and Photoville

Indigenous artists Dakota Mace and Tahila Mintz engage alternative photographic processes and use soil, plants, water, and sun directly in the image-making process to tell stories about the past, present, and future of the land — stories that connect them to their ancestors, and to themselves.

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Rooted

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 1
 archive : 2021

Rooted is a series of images that uses cyanotype imaging of protests layered with plant silhouettes as an exploration of Indigenous identity—bearing witness while documenting the historic year the communities in Minnesota experienced in 2020.

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Runa Kawsay: The Roots That Sustain Us

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 1
 archive : 2021

Runa Kawsay explores the nuances of Indigenous Kichwa identity from the personal experiences of the Kichwa community living in Turtle Island (North America).

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Signs Of Your Identity

Winter Garden Gallery, Brookfield Place
 archive : 2021

The exhibition, on view in the Winter Garden Gallery at Brookfield Place from September 20 – November 15, features portraits by Daniella Zalcman that show Native American, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian survivors of the US government’s Indian Boarding School system and parallel American institutions.

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Dialogue With Plants

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 3
 archive : 2021

Dialogue with Plants documents the Shipibo-Konibo Indigenous people’s use of traditional plant-based medicine, while revealing the threats to the knowledge and use of the diverse flora as elders and Indigenous leaders face the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Here Is Where We Shall Stay

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 1
 archive : 2021

Pat Kane’s project Here is Where We Shall Stay focuses on how Dene people in the Northwest Territories of Northern Canada are moving towards meaningful self-determination by resetting the past atrocities of settler colonization.

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The Power Of Telling Your Own Story

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Fulton Ferry Landing
 archive : 2020

The Standing Strong Project is an ongoing, multi-media, and community-based project that aims to uplift Indigenous peoples in reclaiming their narrative by creating a safe space to make their own image.

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Días Eternos: A Portrait of the Life of Female Prisoners in Venezuela

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Empire Fulton Ferry Lawn
 archive : 2020

In Venezuela, women in prison wait for years–under cramped and deplorable conditions–before moving on to trial to be judged. Will the women be able to return to society upon release? What do their conditions tell us about the state of Venezuelan society?

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Um-basax-bilua (Where They Make the Noise) 1904–2016, 2017

Brooklyn Bridge Park – New Dock Street
 archive : 2020

A visual record of found and personal photographs and cultural memorabilia, Wendy Red Star’s Um-basax-bilua (Where They Make the Noise) summarizes the century-long history of the Crow Fair, and examines the cultural shift from colonial forced assimilation to cultural reclamation.

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Seeds of Resistance

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 3
 archive : 2020

Portraits of traditional peoples of the Amazon, and their sacred territories.

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Stories for the Arctic Refuge

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2019

Stories for the Arctic Refuge explores the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge along with the hundreds of species that depend on it, as well as the Gwich’in and Iñupiat people who rely on it to live, and the big industries that threatens its existence.

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The Cult of Souls

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2019

The Cult of Souls is an ongoing long-term documentary photography project about rural celebrations, and the range of activities offered to visitors. The work is a visual narration of the events that are simultaneously mundane and extraordinary.

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The Place Where Clouds Are Formed

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2019

The Place Where Clouds Are Formed combines poetry, critical text, and photography to investigate the intersection of religion and migration in the borderlands of Arizona and Sonora, the ancestral land of the Tohono O’odham.

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How We See Ourselves

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2019

An exhibition of work from a collective of Indigenous photographers working across Turtle Island (North America).

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Native America

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2019

The exhibit is focused on dismantling stereotypical Native American coverage in the mainstream media with diverse images that present a contemporary viewpoint of what Native America looks like in 2019.

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The Blood and the Rain

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2017

“The Blood and the Rain” is a multimedia collaboration by photographer Yael Martínez and graphic artist Orlando Velázquez, who have been welcomed by the Nahua communities to observe their practices.

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Killing the Black Snake: Resistance at Standing Rock

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2017

The protest against plans to pass the Dakota Access pipeline underneath the Missouri River, just north of the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North Dakota, was considered by many involved to be the time of that prophesy. Indigenous people from around the globe, but especially North America, “heard the call” and traveled to North Dakota to set up a resistance camp against the pipeline.

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Signs of Your Identity

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Emily Warren Roebling Plaza
 archive : 2016

Generations of Canada’s First Nations forgot who they were. Languages died out, sacred ceremonies were criminalized and suppressed. These double exposure portraits explore the trauma of some of the 80,000 living survivors who remain. Through extensive accompanying interviews, they address the impact of intergenerational trauma and lateral violence, documenting the slow path toward healing.

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People of the Horse

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 5 Uplands
 archive : 2014

I travelled to many locations in the western United States to learn about the significance of the horse in Native American culture. The arrival of horse transformed the culture. They allowed tribes to hunt more buffalo than ever before. They tipped the balance of power in favor of mounted warriors and they became prized as wealth. For Native Americans today, horses endure as an emblem of tradition and a source of pride, pageantry, and healing.

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Raskols: The Gangs of Papua New Guinea

Brooklyn Bridge Park – Pier 3
 archive : 2012

In “Raskols: The Gangs of Papua New Guinea,” Australian photographer Stephen Dupont presents a series of portraits that explores the world of cults, custom and tribal culture in Papua New Guinea.

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Events and Sessions Tagged #Indigenous Voices

Oct 32021

New Authors, Old Histories

Join National Geographic photographers Philip Cheung, Kris Graves, and Daniella Zalcman in conversation with National Geographic Executive Editor Debra Adams Simmons, as they discuss their ongoing projects visualizing racist and discriminatory histories through a new lens.

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Sep 182021

Walking Tour With Indigenous Photograph

Put on your walking shoes and your mask, and join the Indigenous Photograph team on a curated tour of the Photoville Festival!

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Oct 102020

Reflecting on Culture & Identity: Photography Talk with Deborah Anderson

Join award-winning photographer and film director, Deborah Anderson, as she brings to light the history and culture of the Lakota tribe with her latest body of work, “Women Of The White Buffalo”.

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Oct 32020

Aperture Conversations: Wendy Red Star

Join us for an artist talk with Wendy Red Star as she discusses her 2017 project Um-basax-bilua (Where They Make the Noise) 1904–2016, a celebration of cultural perseverance, colonial resistance, and ingenuity.

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Sep 192020

Behind the Reporting: Pablo Albarenga and Ana Maria Arévalo

Pulitzer Center grantees Pablo Albarenga and Ana Maria Arévalo Gosen, in conversation with Marina Walker Guevara, discuss their approaches to photographing marginalized communities.

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Sep 222019

A New Vision of the Indigenous Narrative

Five photographers from the Natives Photograph community will discuss their work, the importance of representation in the industry, and their process as Indigenous visual storytellers.

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